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Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell

Posted by thinktankgroup 
Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell
July 11, 2017 07:57AM
Hi there!

We recently purchased a KUKA kr150 r3100 and are looking for some advice or insights on what the best / most functional layout might look like for our 7-axis robotic work cell.

BACKGROUND:
- We have a 30" rotary table w/ 48" dia. table top
- We have a 44 foot track
- Some of our use cases include wood working, foam sculpting, metal work, welding work, etc.

Does anyone of any advice or insights on what might be the best, most strategic layout for our space and the best place to put our table? Would really appreciate any input. Thanks!
VDX
Re: Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell
July 11, 2017 08:48AM
... I've mostly used T-slot plates and sometimes wood or 30mm and 60mm PU-foam plates on top ...


Viktor
Re: Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell
July 17, 2017 08:56AM
VDX, thanks for sharing! Appreciate it!
Re: Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell
July 18, 2017 05:02AM
It is difficult to advise exactly as the products that will go through the cell are so varied. We also have no idea of the quantity of each item you are to produce.
I assume that you will be using the robot for small batch work or one off work.

The standard format for a robot cell is to have the conveyor passing in front of the robot, with the robot arm behind. Parts come in on a pallet on a conveyor, are positioned (sometimes on raised pins) . The robot operation is carried out and then the part proceeds out of the cell. There is also room to the left and right to incorporate tool change or part feeders should you need them.

In a rotary table cell, the table is in front of the robot and it indexes around presenting the part to the robot. This is ideal for manual loading as the operator can load one side of the table, whilst the robot is working. Often tables only have two stations and the table indexes 180 degrees after each job is completed. This is good as you only have to make two jigs to hold the parts in place and is reasonably efficient for cycle time.

One further design to consider is to have several stations in a row, one for woodworking, one for foam sculpting and one for welding (Welding is a dirty process and generally needs to be separate from other processes and needs fume extraction). If you only have one robot, consider having it on a simple rail system. You can then slide the robot manually into each cell as and when the need arises. It doesn't need to be located accurately, but just fixed firmly in each station. Robot software can be incorporated to datum and compensate for any slight positioning error. (You can use fiducial marks or probes to get accurate positioning in each cell)


Helium Frog Website
Re: Looking for Advice on Layout for 7-Axis Robotic Work Cell
July 18, 2017 06:04AM
Quote
martinprice2004
It is difficult to advise exactly as the products that will go through the cell are so varied. We also have no idea of the quantity of each item you are to produce.
I assume that you will be using the robot for small batch work or one off work.

The standard format for a robot cell is to have the conveyor passing in front of the robot, with the robot arm behind. Parts come in on a pallet on a conveyor, are positioned (sometimes on raised pins) . The robot operation is carried out and then the part proceeds out of the cell. There is also room to the left and right to incorporate tool change or part feeders should you need them.

In a rotary table cell, the table is in front of the robot and it indexes around presenting the part to the robot. This is ideal for manual loading as the operator can load one side of the table, whilst the robot is working. Often tables only have two stations and the table indexes 180 degrees after each job is completed. This is good as you only have to make two jigs to hold the parts in place and is reasonably efficient for cycle time.

One further design to consider is to have several stations in a row, one for woodworking, one for foam sculpting and one for welding (Welding is a dirty process and generally needs to be separate from other processes and needs fume extraction). If you only have one robot, consider having it on a simple rail system. You can then slide the robot manually into each cell as and when the need arises. It doesn't need to be located accurately, but just fixed firmly in each station. Robot software can be incorporated to datum and compensate for any slight positioning error. (You can use fiducial marks or probes to get accurate positioning in each cell)

These are some great points. Thanks so much for sharing these tips - I really appreciate it.
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